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Have any strange animal sightings in your area?


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jeff   posted:8/12/2010 10:07:38 PM  (Reply)
National Geographic wants to know. What was it? Where was it? Post them here :)
jaguarsky   posted:8/22/2010 1:34:09 PM  (Reply)
OOO...OOO...OOO! I have one. I have one. For the past several years in and around the north shore of Choke Canyon Lake in South TX, we have seen a strange cat-like creature. The sightings usually start in Nov. and last through most of Jan., and then no sightings at all for the remaining month's. Now we all did our homework and thought we had identified the beastie as the rare and reclusive jaguarundi, which used to be present throughout the area. The animal is the same size and shape, lives in the preferred habitat and the presumed mating season is the same period as the sightings we have had. We were completely sure it was a jaguarundi and we were so excited to have been privilaged enough to see one.Imagine our disapointment when after contacting the TX animal authorities we were told the animal is absolutely not a jaguarundi. They are none in this area. Nope, zip, zero, nada jaguarundies here. "But we've seen them!" we countered. But since we had no pictures we could not back up our observations. So according to TX, what we saw was not jaguarundi; SO WHAT IS IT? Boy, we really hope that NatGeo comes to investigate. Just thinking about what it could be if not jaguarundi is frightening. Alien hybrid? Stray kitty mutated by drilling chemicals? OMG, please, somebody come down here and find out what is going on!! 
tapuout4985   posted:8/22/2010 3:09:15 PM  (Reply)

In Reply To:
jaguarsky  posted:8/22/2010 1:34:09 PM  (Reply)
OOO...OOO...OOO! I have one. I have one. For the past several years in and around the north shore of Choke Canyon Lake in South TX, we have seen a strange cat-like creature. The sightings usually start in Nov. and last through most of Jan., and then no sightings at all for the remaining month's. Now we all did our homework and thought we had identified the beastie as the rare and reclusive jaguarundi, which used to be present throughout the area. The animal is the same size and shape, lives in the preferred habitat and the presumed mating season is the same period as the sightings we have had. We were completely sure it was a jaguarundi and we were so excited to have been privilaged enough to see one.Imagine our disapointment when after contacting the TX animal authorities we were told the animal is absolutely not a jaguarundi. They are none in this area. Nope, zip, zero, nada jaguarundies here. "But we've seen them!" we countered. But since we had no pictures we could not back up our observations. So according to TX, what we saw was not jaguarundi; SO WHAT IS IT? Boy, we really hope that NatGeo comes to investigate. Just thinking about what it could be if not jaguarundi is frightening. Alien hybrid? Stray kitty mutated by drilling chemicals? OMG, please, somebody come down here and find out what is going on!! 
I would be willing to bet that you were actually correct in your original assessment.  Department of Natural Resources and similar organizations have two fatal flaws.  One is that they usually aren't as "in the know" about what the animals are really doing as they should be and the second  is that a lot of the time they want to keep secrets from the public because if they came out and said that a species of large feline was moving back into the area after x period of time some dumbass is going to panic and either make a big fuss in the media, or a poacher is going to go after it.  Here in the Loess Hills of Iowa for years the DNR denied the existence of bobcats, now there is a trapping season for them.  Then they denied for years that there were mountain lions in the area until some cop just across the river in Nebraska had to put one down.  I myself had a pack of wolves run in front of my car one night.  The DNR told me they were just coyotes because obviously 20 years of hunting and trapping experience I can't tell the difference between a 20 pound dog and a 150 pound dog.  Two weeks later someone got video of the pack running through the state park just north of my place.  The expansion of white settlers through the late 1700s and 1800s pushed all these species west into the Rocky Mountains and north into Canada, but now they are getting used to the nonNative American people and their cities and are starting to move back into their original habitats.  I say you should trust your eyes and your research, and leave the "man" out of it :-)
jaguarsky   posted:8/23/2010 8:42:21 AM  (Reply)

In Reply To:
tapuout4985  posted:8/22/2010 3:09:15 PM  (Reply)
I would be willing to bet that you were actually correct in your original assessment.  Department of Natural Resources and similar organizations have two fatal flaws.  One is that they usually aren't as "in the know" about what the animals are really doing as they should be and the second  is that a lot of the time they want to keep secrets from the public because if they came out and said that a species of large feline was moving back into the area after x period of time some dumbass is going to panic and either make a big fuss in the media, or a poacher is going to go after it.  Here in the Loess Hills of Iowa for years the DNR denied the existence of bobcats, now there is a trapping season for them.  Then they denied for years that there were mountain lions in the area until some cop just across the river in Nebraska had to put one down.  I myself had a pack of wolves run in front of my car one night.  The DNR told me they were just coyotes because obviously 20 years of hunting and trapping experience I can't tell the difference between a 20 pound dog and a 150 pound dog.  Two weeks later someone got video of the pack running through the state park just north of my place.  The expansion of white settlers through the late 1700s and 1800s pushed all these species west into the Rocky Mountains and north into Canada, but now they are getting used to the nonNative American people and their cities and are starting to move back into their original habitats.  I say you should trust your eyes and your research, and leave the "man" out of it :-)
Exactly! We know what we saw. And there is much other anecdotal evidence for the presence of jaguarundi in our area. We were told that a group of wildlife "scientists" came here and did a two year study of what animals populated the park and they found no evidence of the cats. I guess they didin't know where to look. I think the main reason that there is a push to keep the cats a secret is that it would, maybe, change the trapping and snaring laws in the area. Many of the ranchers put snares everywhere, ostensibly to cull the coyote population but they also catch bobcats, birds of prey and anything else that might wander by. The snares are often not checked for days and the animals suffer a torturous death. There is a certain wrestling star, movie actor that owns large ranch here and the adjoining rancher often finds dead and or dying animals caught in snares set on the property line. Of course, the laws might not change as the TX wildlife guy told me that it is still legal to snare in areas where there are remnant ocelot populations. I guess that's TX for you.As an aside; we lived in Maine for many years and were told that there were no cougars there. Then there was some scat, hair samples and photos. Well, they said, maybe there are a couple but there is not a viable population, even though in one case of paw prints a cub's prints were plainly visible. Also, they told us that there were no wolves in Maine until some idiot hunter killed one. Many people saw and photographed what looked very much like wolves, and so on. Now, they tell us that what we are/were seeing are a "new" hybrid of wolf and coyote. Much, much larger than coyotes, yet somewhat smaller than wolves. Go figure.For the life of me I can't understand why those people who are supposed to study and document these things won't take mountains of anecdotal evidence as part of the equation.A number of us "birders" here in our little area of TX have run across the same thing with migratory birds. There have been a number of Central American species coming much farther north that ever before. We can document date, place and activity, but without a photograph the sighting is ignored. I am still trying to get that photo of the crimson collared grossbeak, and the jaguarundi, and Threetoes (the resident B.F.). All I need to do is win the lotto so I can afford to outfit everyone with cameras and camera traps. Someday.
tapuout4985   posted:8/23/2010 8:33:39 PM  (Reply)

In Reply To:
jaguarsky  posted:8/23/2010 8:42:21 AM  (Reply)
Exactly! We know what we saw. And there is much other anecdotal evidence for the presence of jaguarundi in our area. We were told that a group of wildlife "scientists" came here and did a two year study of what animals populated the park and they found no evidence of the cats. I guess they didin't know where to look. I think the main reason that there is a push to keep the cats a secret is that it would, maybe, change the trapping and snaring laws in the area. Many of the ranchers put snares everywhere, ostensibly to cull the coyote population but they also catch bobcats, birds of prey and anything else that might wander by. The snares are often not checked for days and the animals suffer a torturous death. There is a certain wrestling star, movie actor that owns large ranch here and the adjoining rancher often finds dead and or dying animals caught in snares set on the property line. Of course, the laws might not change as the TX wildlife guy told me that it is still legal to snare in areas where there are remnant ocelot populations. I guess that's TX for you.As an aside; we lived in Maine for many years and were told that there were no cougars there. Then there was some scat, hair samples and photos. Well, they said, maybe there are a couple but there is not a viable population, even though in one case of paw prints a cub's prints were plainly visible. Also, they told us that there were no wolves in Maine until some idiot hunter killed one. Many people saw and photographed what looked very much like wolves, and so on. Now, they tell us that what we are/were seeing are a "new" hybrid of wolf and coyote. Much, much larger than coyotes, yet somewhat smaller than wolves. Go figure.For the life of me I can't understand why those people who are supposed to study and document these things won't take mountains of anecdotal evidence as part of the equation.A number of us "birders" here in our little area of TX have run across the same thing with migratory birds. There have been a number of Central American species coming much farther north that ever before. We can document date, place and activity, but without a photograph the sighting is ignored. I am still trying to get that photo of the crimson collared grossbeak, and the jaguarundi, and Threetoes (the resident B.F.). All I need to do is win the lotto so I can afford to outfit everyone with cameras and camera traps. Someday.
Yeah, I've gone through so much of the same thing here.  I think the "officials" have this mental block where they think if they admit there is something new in the area they'll lose credibility.  That's the impression I got when dealing with them and it doesn't make sense.  Animals move, that's just a fact of life.  I know that my research showed large cat breeds such as mountain lions can roam as far as 200 miles from the time they become independent of their parent(s) to when they take a territory of their own.    I've watched the IDNR deny species after species when there are hundreds of knowledgable witnesses seeing them.  Bobcat, mountain lion, wolves, bald eagles, mink, badgers, golden eagles; all species that 10 years ago the IDNR denied being in Iowa and are now common place sights or at least confirmed as having been in the area.  I guess some people just can't accept that yesterday's world might not be today's world.
MissippiGhostHunter   posted:8/24/2010 8:09:15 PM  (Reply)
I got one there is a strange gray creature that lives out in the woods in D'lverville,Ms its located nearly half a mile from the high school it has chased me and a cuple of friends walking home from school sevarl times but its pure gray and looks like it has scaly skin and walks on 4 legs when roaming around and runs on 2 scarys the crap out of every one with this very wierd scream that deafens the ears local people have said it has been there for years we have no explainion for it at all
f1refly   posted:8/28/2010 8:00:15 PM  (Reply)
Here in Indiana, There is this cat that is terrifying the local squirrels in my back yard. Orangeish color with some white in it. I go outside but then its vanishes. The big tree in my yard is full of squirrels and they are all terrified, some too much so to even come out and get the peanuts i toss out. Its strange cause i normally don't get cats comming into my back yard.My druggy friend said once he saw a Carp fish with four legs walking across the field as we drove by somewhere around New Castle, IN. He swore by it.


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